Foxridge Collegiate Apartment Homes

750 Hethwood Blvd. 100G, Blacksburg, VA 24060
Call: (888) 532-1809 (540) 951-9302 Email Usinfo@foxridgeliving.com View Map
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Apartment Homes Blacksburg, VA Blog

Holiday Events Around Virginia’s Blue Ridge

Joseph Coupal - Monday, November 27, 2017

Foxridge apartments, Blacksburg, VAThe Town of Blacksburg and the surrounding area hosts a number of festivals and events for people of all ages and interests. No matter the season, there is a holiday event on the schedule and there is something for everyone.

If you live in an apartment in Blacksburg, VA and are looking for fun holiday events taking place throughout the region in the coming weeks, look no further. Here’s a preview of what’s on the calendar for the 2017 holiday season in Virginia’s Blue Ridge!

Winter Lights Festival Holiday Parade

Held the first Friday in December. Featuring the Holiday Parade, Tree Lighting Ceremony, Santa at the Lyric, and more. Downtown Merchants' annual open houses, late night shopping, free gift wrap, snacks and beverages, holiday specials.

Parades

The marching bands will put on a show and you can decide which group built the most creative float for the numerous holiday parades in Virginia’s Blue Ridge. Santa has also been known to make an appearance!

  • Christmas Parade - Downtown Vinton, November 30
  • 61st Annual Salem Christmas Parade - Downtown Salem, December 1
  • Franklin County Christmas Parade - Downtown Rocky Mount, December 3
  • Buchanan Christmas Parade - Downtown Buchanan, December 9
  • City of Roanoke Christmas Parade - Downtown Roanoke, December 9

Holiday Festivals

Enjoy many of the classic holiday flavors and browse from an impressive selection of local gift items at these popular festivals.

  • Dickens of a Christmas - Downtown Roanoke, December 1, 8, 15
  • Gingerbread Festival - Salem Public Library, December 2
  • Ye Olde Salem Christmas - Salem Farmers Market, December 9
  • Historical Holiday Events

Many of our historical sites and museums in Virginia’s Blue Ridge join the fun of the holiday season with special events and features that take you back in time.

  • Fantasyland - O. Winston Link Museum, November 24 - December 21
  • Toys of Christmas Past - Salem Museum, November 24 - January 13
  • Holiday Candlelight Tours - Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest, December 1-16
  • An Old Virginia Christmas - Booker T. Washington National Monument, December 2
  • Candy Cane Express - Virginia Museum of Transportation, December 2-3
  • Live Nativity Event - Camp Eagle, December 2-3, 9-10

Tree Lightings

The holiday spirit truly takes over when you join the crowd in the exciting countdown of lighting a Christmas tree.

  • City of Roanoke Christmas Tree Lighting at Dickens of a Christmas - Downtown Roanoke, December 1
  • Roanoke County’s Christmas Tree Lighting - South County Library, December 4

#HowYouLive

visitroanokeva.com/ blacksburg.gov


Virginia Peanut Pie

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, November 21, 2017

This pie is inspired by the version served at the Virginia Diner, a landmark restaurant in Wakefield, Virginia, that's renowned for this dessert. If you are hosting Thanksgiving in your apartment in Blacksburg, VA or headed back to your parent's home, this is the perfect dessert.

Foxridge apartments, Blacksburg, VAPie Crust:

2 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon sugar
2 sticks cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
7 to 8 tablespoons ice water

DIRECTIONS

1. Pulse flour, salt, and sugar in a food processor until combined. Add butter and pulse until mixture resembles coarse meal with some pea-size pieces remaining. Drizzle 5 tablespoons water over mixture; pulse several times to combine. Add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, and pulse until mixture holds together when pinched.

2. For a 9-inch pie, shape dough into two disks and wrap each in plastic. For a slab pie, shape dough into a rectangle and wrap in plastic. Refrigerate at least 1 hour and up to 1 day, or freeze up to 3 months; thaw overnight in refrigerator before using.

Pie:

INGREDIENTS

3 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
1 disk of the pie crust (above)
3 large eggs, room temperature
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled
3/4 cup packed light-brown sugar
3/4 cup golden syrup, such as Lyle's
2 tablespoons apple-cider vinegar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, plus more for serving (optional)
1 1/2 cups roasted unsalted Virginia peanuts
Vanilla ice cream, for serving

DIRECTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out dough to an 11-inch round. Transfer to a 9-inch pie dish; trim edges to a 1/2-inch overhang. Tuck overhang under and crimp edges with the tines of a fork; freeze until firm, about 15 minutes.

2. Line crust with parchment and fill with dried beans or pie weights. Bake until bottom no longer looks wet, about 25 minutes. Carefully remove parchment and beans; continue baking until light golden, about 10 minutes more. Let cool completely on a wire rack.

3. Whisk eggs in a large bowl. Add butter, brown sugar, syrup, vinegar, flour, salt, vanilla, and cayenne; whisk until smooth. Coarsely chop 1 cup peanuts and stir into egg mixture, then pour into cooled crust. Scatter remaining 1/2 cup peanuts evenly over top.

4. Bake until crust is golden brown and filling is puffed slightly and set, 40 to 50 minutes (if crust is browning too quickly, tent with foil). Let cool completely on wire rack. Slice and serve, with scoops of ice cream lightly sprinkled with cayenne.

Happy Thanksgiving from Foxridge Apartments!

Image/Recipe - marthastewart.com

#HowYouLive


Dorm vs. Apartment: Which to Choose?

Joseph Coupal - Monday, November 13, 2017

Foxridge apartments, Blacksburg, VAThe choice between living on- or off-campus can be as difficult as choosing which college to attend. Just as you debated the pros and cons of each college campus, similar consideration should be given to your housing choice. For incoming freshmen, the choice will probably be made for you. But if you are a sophomore or upperclassman, you might want to consider living off-campus. Before you make a decision, let’s take a look at what each option has to offer.

Dorm Life

  • Utilities Included - Unlike apartments, the Internet, telephone, cable, water, and electricity is typically free in a dorm. Some colleges may charge a small connection fee for cable or Internet, but it’s not nearly as expensive as the monthly fees you would pay in an apartment.
  • Social Life – Most college dorms have planned social activities each month that help students meet new people and make new friends. There are several campus activities, usually within walking distance of your dorm. For example, you might be able to go to a football game, watch a movie, or attend a club function. Don’t forget, most campus activities are also free to students!
  • Resident Advisor (RA) – Someone is always on staff at the dorms to handle emergencies or to lend a shoulder to cry on after a hard day. Think of your RA as a combination of building superintendent and your big brother/sister.
  • Less Chores – Many students who live on-campus also purchase a meal plan. This means you don’t have to cook or clean any dishes! The college may also provide cleaning services for the common areas and community bathrooms, so you’ll only be responsible for making your bed and washing your clothes. • Free Amenities – Some college dormitories come equipped with game rooms, pool tables, and a large-screen TVs for watching movies or sports.

Apartment Living

  • Privacy – Let’s face it, it’s nearly impossible to have any privacy in a dorm. Apartments provide much more privacy. Even if you choose a 'shared' apartment arrangement, which are popular at communities near college campuses, you will typically have a private bedroom and bathroom.
  • Fewer Rules – In the dorm, you will have very strict codes of conduct and possibly even a curfew. When you live in an apartment, you can come and go as you please, often with fewer restrictions on what you can do within your own space. Another advantage is less surprise inspections. Although the apartment manager may have access to your space at any time, he/she will typically notify you in advance. Dorm inspections can happen any time and occur frequently.
  • More Space - In most cases, your apartment will have much more space than your dorm. You’ll have a full kitchen, a living area, a bedroom, and a private bathroom. In the dorm, you’ll be lucky to have enough space for your bed and a desk.
  • Food is Cheaper – In many cases, shopping for groceries and making your own meals is cheaper than the campus meal plans or ordering fast food. On-campus, you have fewer options for meals and you are at the mercy of the cafeteria’s hours. Living in an apartment gives you the option of more menu choices and you can eat whenever you feel hungry.
  • Entertain Guests – Unlike the dormitory, you won’t have to ask permission of the RA or your roommate to have a guest over for dinner or to spend the night. Parties are also easier to host off-campus, but keep in mind your neighbors will not take kindly to loud music at all hours of the night.

Before deciding which option may be best for you, consider all the costs associated with both living arrangements. Each will offer different challenges and perks, but both will help guide you on your path toward adulthood and parent-free living. In the battle between dorm and apartment living, there’s really no wrong or right answer; it’s a personal choice every college student will need to make.

For more information on apartments in Blacksburg, VA for students, contact Foxridge.

#HowYouLive

unigo.


Veterans will Soon Shop Tax-Free

Joseph Coupal - Friday, November 10, 2017

Foxridge Apartment, Blacksburg, VAIf you are part of the ROTC program at Virginia Tech, you may come from a family of veterans or you may know veterans. Either way, you'll be interested to know that starting later this year, all honorably discharged veterans, no matter their branch of service, will be eligible to shop tax-free online at the Army & Air Force Exchange Service with the same discounts they enjoyed on base while in the military. It’s the latest way in which the organization is trying to keep its customers as the armed forces shrink and airmen and soldiers buy more for delivery.

Adding 13 million potential new customers will give extra ammunition to the group that runs the stores on U.S. Army and Air Force bases worldwide as it fights Amazon and other retailers for veterans’ online shopping dollars.

Since hiring its first civilian CEO five years ago, the Exchange has upgraded the brands at base stores to include items like Disney toys, Michael Kors fashions and other top names. Like private stores, it’s also imposed tighter cost controls, reduced the number of employees and improved people’s experience on the website.

“The intent is to really beat Amazon at their game because we have locations literally on the installations,” said CEO Tom Shull. “We’re leaning toward not just ship-from-store but pick-up-from-store and eventually deliver-from-store.”

The Exchange is adding shipping centers within its stores to allow it to send products directly from those locations more cheaply and quickly. Twenty-six stores now ship orders, and that will expand to 55 by the end of the year.

Within the next three years, Shull said the goal is to deliver something on base within two hours of when it is ordered. That’s possible partly because the Exchanges are already on base, cleared by security.

The Exchange delivers most orders on the second day now. Shull said shipping from stores will make a big difference in regions around bases, which are often in more rural areas.

Expanding online shopping to all honorably discharged veterans is expected to add about $200 million annually within three years to the $8.3 billion in sales the Exchanges generated last year.

Adding those shoppers, what Shull called “the foundation of our growth,” is critical to help offset the 13 percent decline in the number of active-duty Army and Air Force soldiers since 2011 when the Exchange generated $10.3 billion revenue.

“It’s a modest benefit, but it can save you thousands of dollars a year,” said Shull, a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy who served in the Army for a decade before starting a retail career at chains including Macy’s.

Former Marine Forrest Cornelius was among the first to sign up at the verification website when it launched in June, and got a chance to start shopping early to test it out. The 51-year-old was impressed by the site and a deal he found on Ray-Ban sunglasses.

“The biggest thing is price. They’re always going to be a little bit cheaper,” said Cornelius, who lives in Dallas.

But competing on price in today’s retail environment is increasingly difficult, said Edward Jones analyst Brian Yarbrough. Just look at how much trouble Walmart has competing with Amazon, he said, because Walmart has the fixed costs associated with its stores.

“To think you’re going to compete on price, you’re going to have a hard time there,” he said.

Under Shull’s leadership, the Exchange stores have traded their industrial feel and reliance on off-brand merchandise for a more modern look featuring well-known labels.

Two-thirds of the main Exchange store at Offutt Air Force Base resembles any department store, with prominent displays of name-brand makeup, Nike fitness gear and Carter’s clothes for kids. The rest is filled with the kind of electronics, appliances, housewares and toys found at Walmart or Sears, with major brands in every section.

The Exchanges don’t pay rent for their military base locations, and the government transports some of their supplies and goods to far-flung locations, but otherwise they operate mostly like an independent retailer. Roughly two-thirds of the employees are family members of soldiers or airmen.

The Exchange, which is part of the Defense Department, reported earnings of $384 million last year. That’s a sharp contrast from five years ago when Shull arrived to projections of $180 million in losses.

Of last year’s profit, $225 million was returned to the defense department to help pay for quality-of-life programs on bases like child development and fitness centers. Besides the main stores, the Exchanges also operate more than 70 movie theaters and bring in franchise restaurants and other vendors for the shopping malls it operates on bases.

Shull feels those are good reasons for the new online shopping privileges to draw veterans to do their shopping there.

“Veterans value the cost savings and what they can do to support the military,” he said.

#HowYouLive

militarytimes.com



Foxridge Collegiate Apartment Homes

750 Hethwood Blvd. 100G, Blacksburg, VA 24060
Call: (888) 532-1809 (540) 951-9302
Email Usinfo@foxridgeliving.com
View Map
Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-5:30P | Saturday: 10A-1P & 2P-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

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